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Author Topic: Neat/3  (Read 71942 times)
RetrospectUK
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« Reply #15 on: May 21, 2007, 10:04:38 am »

Katsuhiko

It was good to read that you still have meetings of ex employees in Japan. I have a 16mm film of the building and opening of the Oiso factory in 1956 and 1957.

I have put a digital copy of it at http://www.ncr.org.uk/html%20files/Films.htm
The film was originally silent but I have added background music which you can turn off.

I hope that you enjoy it and that it brings back some good memories.

Ian (UK)
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n8eyh with OCD-WM42 of Hilse
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« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2007, 01:56:11 pm »

Dear Ian, UK

  Good afternoon and good evening from Yokohama located near the Oiso factory of NCR.
I appreciate your information.
It's very valuable.
I could find out, Great person, Mr. Gorge Haynes in his younger days, when I was just only 11 years old,
an elemental school boy.
I have enjoyed very much remembering the entrance door of the factory building and the employee restaurant.

Thank you so much, Ian.
I transfered the url address to my NEAT/14 member.

Best regards,
Katsuhiko
« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 12:19:22 am by n8eyh » Logged

Katsuhiko Hirai
Fan of the Century architecture under 63 index registers.
modus
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« Reply #17 on: August 20, 2007, 11:55:20 pm »

I remember in IT, when they were forcing us to move to COBOL 68 from NEAT/3. 

So our first command in our COBOL proceedure division was Enter NEAT/3 level II.


Good old -- Mode2(m2) and Mode 3(m3) commands Smiley
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iainr
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« Reply #18 on: September 28, 2007, 09:12:25 pm »

Just found this website. Brings back many good memories.
Unfortunately I thew out most of my NEAT/3 and Century stuff 20 years ago.
But I still have the following handbooks
3 - Century Handbook for Systems Analysts.  2 Blue (SP-1425 1074 & 0677)  1 Pink (UK DC507)
1 - Century Operator's Handbook pale blue (ST-1360 1076)
1 Criterion RS1 handbook for Systems Analysts. Yellow ST-1377 0776
1 Criterion RS1 Operator's handbook. Yellow ST-1378 0776

3 - 8200 Cobol Students Text Yellow EP-9867 0774, pale green EP-9820 0176, Green (UK DC/516)
1 - 8200 Cobol pocket reference Green (UK DC-517)

I worked in the Birmingham(UK) office from 1968-71, 72-77) with a year in Dayton (1976-77) mainly on the Century 100/200 and then on 8200.
NCR was the best training ground there was.

Iain
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n8eyh with OCD-WM42 of Hilse
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« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2007, 06:20:28 pm »

Ian, RetrospectUK

  Good morning from Japan.
I noticed that the memorial factory 'old E&M Oiso' in Japan have been disappeared recently.
Last weekend, I triped to the hospital where my first grand daughter was born in last week
through the front of the old Oiso factory of NCR that developed and produced many cash registers in 1900s.
I was very surprised at the surface of the white sand ground where the factory stood.
Because there is no building there. It looks like the place of the building #10 of NCR Dayton in 1980s.

New human life has been started, and old production lines had finished the life cycle.
I was thinking of our eternal memory in the train.

Have a good memory,
Katsuhiko
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Katsuhiko Hirai
Fan of the Century architecture under 63 index registers.
HowardParsons
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« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2008, 10:23:45 pm »

Hello Ian,
    I am a NEAT/3 relic. I began my career in 1974 operating an NCR Century 101 for Best Products in Richmond, VA. My computer had an amazing 32 K of memory. I left Best Products in 1975 & moved to Atlanta and wound up operating another 101 for Capitol Food Distributors. They subsequently upgraded to a 151 & then a Criterion 8550. The 151 was sold to an auto-parts distributor, Peachtree Warehose Distributors, in Chamblee, GA - just north of Atlanta. I got tired of working the 2nd shift & left to go to work for Peachtree Warehouse where I was reunited with the 151. It was there that I first began programming in NEAT/3 - mostly short programmes or small mods to existing applications.

   Peachtree ran into financial difficulties about a year later and I left for a few months & then returned as it appeared that the company was going to stay afloat just a bit longer. When Peachtree finally did go under, I went to The Harrison Company, a lawbook publisher, where I worked as a programmer for 3 & 1/2 years. I mainly wrote applications for their electronic publishing & composition system in NEAT/VS though I did cobble a few applications in NCR Cobol & RPG II.

   I finally left NCR systems in 1982 when I relocated to Charlottesville, VA to work for another legal publisher. While I was at Peachtree Warehouse, my predecessor was a fellow named Loren Wilson. Although he had moved on, he did stop by the shop one day for a brief visit. In 1986, Loren came to work as my boss in CHarlottesville, VA.

   Since those heady days w/ NEAT/3 & NEAT/VS, I've coded WANG & IBM assembler, WANG & IBM COBOL, PL/1, C, Perl & Java. Truth be told, I've never enjoyed programming as much as I did on NCR systems & would give anything to be able to write some NEAT/3 code again. (Remembering how is another matter!) Wink

Howard Parsons
LexisNexis
Charlottesville, VA
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Aleksandrs Guba
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« Reply #21 on: February 08, 2008, 10:08:26 pm »

Hi Howard,

There are words in your post which I am ready to join to (just modifying slightly the name of language): "Truth be told, I've never enjoyed programming as much as I did on NCR systems & would give anything to be able to write some NEAT 399 code again".

Welcome aboard!
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Mel Lee
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« Reply #22 on: March 06, 2008, 01:40:04 pm »

Neat/s and periodin assembly commands like Jump to register "51" command or was it "15" common and I developed subroutines like a print, or open, or close end program decks of cards to re load in every program compile to save making errors.  Even used "Best" macros

This was at Landsdown iN Toronto at NCR Canada head office where I wrote payroll and then manufacturing software for the plant.  I was fresh out of University where we used IBM 360 Fortran

When I asked to go on a Cobol program they thought I was crazy and a heritic.  I transfered to sales of the 615 and was qyite good replacing 7 IBM 360's the first year with solution selling from our ORBIT and GL and Manufacturing then later SPIRIT

I never looked back $$$ and CPC in ROME etc. year after year.  Had user base of 26 Centurys.  When corporate moved to Century Avenue in Mississauga my customers called it "Head Crash Alley" even after ceramic heads were llocated by who's disck screamed the loudest.

Mel Lee

Last position after Indusrty Retail manager was with Jerry Stead as "Champion of Change Our Common Bond
Canada
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uglytuna
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« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2008, 08:52:04 pm »

Greetings Katsuhiko,

When you mentioned Sumitomo Bank, I immediately thought of how we used to be so proud of the fact that our Japanese NCR team could bring so many advanced hardware and software computing technologies to our company.  Especially the Century 350 running an enhanced B4 operating system with enhanced 624 on-line communications processors.

I thought I might share a story of my first experience with NEAT.  I was a 315 service man in Grand Rapids, Michigan in 1967 where I installed and maintained 315 computers for several customers in the area.  Our branch parts department inventory control was a manual process at the time.  If someone took the last part out of a bin, he was supposed to order another one.  As we grew in size and numbers, it became nearly impossible to keep parts on hand.

At that time I was working on a 315 program that played music through a radio set upon the processor cabinet.  It was written in machine code (we called it “Absolute” code), entered on a Class 31 accounting machine with a custom form bar and paper tape punch.  One of the 315 instructors in Dayton, I think it was Pete Lord, discovered that the Accumulator circuitry would resonate at radio frequencies when performing the Load, Store, and Shift commands in specific timed loop sequences.  I thought it was “way cool” and modified it to play other songs.  When I showed our branch manager how a 315 could play music on a radio he asked me if I could “program” our branch service parts inventory.  After doing a little analysis I figured that it could be done with about a half dozen or so programs, and he said, do it.

I asked the DP manager, Henry Redder, at First State Bank in Zeeland, Michigan if I could use his 315 system to develop the application and he gave me the go ahead.  Then, after a couple of weeks of coding in Absolute, punching it up on PPT, and testing, Henry told me I should look into programming it in NEAT.  He said it would be ever so much easier, what with all the fancy things such as a compiler that actually generated macros by writing just a single command.  So I read the manual, asked him a ton of questions, studied this new (to me) process; NEAT programming language including macros, source coding sheets, form bar, compiler, object code (Absolute…this I understood and could easily apply "patches"), and listings.  With all that help it wasn’t long before our service manager had a Master report of our parts inventory showing part number and name, bin location, high-order, on-hand count, and low-order point.  This was followed by an automated Order report listing all parts that reached their low-order point.

I was hooked.  Maintaining hardware took a back step for me to working with software.  It wasn’t long before I transferred to Systems Services in Dayton.

Another old war story…

Best regards,

Herb Fish
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JimT
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« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2008, 07:02:59 am »

"One of the 315 instructors in Dayton, I think it was Pete Lord, ---"

I knew Pete Lord.  The last time I saw him he was working on open architecture software for test systems.  He and I are/were into fast cars.  He built a 600 ci Cadillac engine and put it into his '79 Cadillac Seville.  A very talented man.
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uglytuna
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« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2008, 10:25:26 pm »

Pete Lord was a wonderful instructor.  He taught 315 processor to our class in late '65.  It was one of the longer courses in our 42 week curriculum.  He knew the hardware and logic like the back of his hand and had a knack at explaining it so others could understand, and more importantly, maintain and service it if (when) it failed.  He was a master at inflicting damage to a perfectly good processor and then encourage us to resolve and repair the failure within a given time period.

He only washed out a few guys mainly because of his teaching skills.  We studied hard at each other’s apartment on Thursday nights, dreading the next day’s You Bet Your Job weekly exam, especially apprentices who had already failed two exams to that point.  Their tenure at “The Cash” would come to an abrupt halt upon failing a third exam.

When you left his class and went on to the next class, the 340 printer as I recall, you had the confidence that you knew the machine and could take care of anything that went wrong with it.  But then you were subjected to Dayton logic after mastering Hawthorn logic...

Herb

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Neat3Century
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« Reply #26 on: May 10, 2008, 05:45:05 am »

In the early 1970s I operated a NCR Century computer and we had to learn Neat/3. I also posted this information on computerLanguages.
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n8eyh with OCD-WM42 of Hilse
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« Reply #27 on: May 31, 2008, 07:04:36 am »

Dear Herb, and all!

  Good morning and good evening from Yokohama, Japan.
I can revive my activity on this site freely, because Norton security software of my PC have accepted my clicking into this web.

Well, Herb,
you push my memory back during the 1970s decade in the computer center of Sumitomo Bank, Osaka, my dreamable ages as a software engineer with our great bosses and team.

Our top great boss is Mr. Masaya Ito who is the founder to initiate our dream coming true at the Sumitomo Bank by his systems approach since NCR 304 computer selling.
My first time to meet him was when he invited us, freshmen of the system support division (SSD) in NCR Japan, into the discussion room, in order to teach his policy of the business manner as software engineers for our customers. For example, (1) he suggested that we has to look at the eyes of customers always during presentation and negotiation. (2) Boys be ambitious. He introduced his story to get an order from Sumitomo Bank that accepted the network coupled NCR 315RMC distributed-processing systems around 1960s. He said that he used to, in his heart, sing a song 'Jinsei-gekijo' (The dramatic stage of one's whole life, in English expression) looking at the famous tall tower of Osake, 'Tsuhteng-kaku', in order to get the good final decision by Sumitomo Bank. The song word is, 'I am sure to try without giving up', for example.
I had encouraged very much by his speach in 1969.

Our next great boss is Mr. Ikuo Akiyama who invented the transaction-process based realtime superior operating systems of NCR. He had implemented the software science into the software engineering & architecture during 1960s. He had tried to reduce the dumb procedure of software by his idea to implement the multi-treading and the MMU-based shielding architecture of software in oreder to get the high performance of processing under the easy designing and programming for the customer. It's so great view thbrough the 'Dyna-probe' logic analyzer.

Under coaching of them, we the freshperson team had grown to best fighters in the computer business through developing the large scaled operating systems for NCR Century.

I would like to know the development story of Century B-series software around late 1960s.
I am thinking that the designer and developer would get much hard development as the initiator of the first disk-based operating systems with the large scaled software overlay.
Because I have much interests in the design story of the third generation software in NCR Dayton.
Does anyone introduce your understanding?

Best regards,
Katsuhiko
Yokohama, Japan
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Katsuhiko Hirai
Fan of the Century architecture under 63 index registers.
Herman
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« Reply #28 on: July 16, 2008, 09:14:24 pm »

Quote
NEAT/3 was an Assembly language used in NCR-315 systems.
NEATVS  came later with the Criterion Series (NCR-8500) in 1970s

NEAT = 315
NEAT/3 = Century
NEAT/VS = Criterion
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QuietBS
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« Reply #29 on: August 25, 2008, 09:18:01 pm »

I just discovered this site today and what a wonderful flood of memories from my old NCR days. 

I'm an old banking CIF, CLASS, STARCOM guy and miss NEAT/3, VS, and VRX.  Nothing like being in my office in the middle of the night with a 500-page dump trying to figure out why that register went haywire (it was usually one of my patches!).

After the end of the NCR I knew, I would never again get as proficient in a language as I had become in NEAT/3 and NEATVS.  Which is why I'm in management now, where old coders go to die.  Smiley

Bruce
Maryland
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