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NCR Computers of the 20th Century => Operating Systems => Topic started by: Aleksandrs Guba on March 20, 2008, 06:36:27 pm



Title: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: Aleksandrs Guba on March 20, 2008, 06:36:27 pm
As far as I know these are main NCR proprietary OS:

- STEP - OS for NCR 315 with 33x magnetic tape drives;
- KERNEL - OS for NCR 315 with CRAM;
- B1 - OS for NCR Century series computers;
- B2 - OS for NCR Century series computers;
- B3 - OS for NCR Century series computers;
- B4 - OS for NCR Century series computers;
- DNOS - OS for NCR computers;
- IMOS II, III, IV, V - OS for NCR 8200 series;
- IRX - OS for NCR 8200, 8400 series;
- MOS - Multiprogramming OS for NCR Century 300 - 350 computers;
- S2 - Resident executive for the C-615-100 online realtime OS;
- SIX - Executive for micro-coded minicomputers;
- TOX - OS for NCR Century 350 computers at Sumitomo bank, Japan;
- TOX-B1 - Dispatching kernel for the B1 under the TOX OS;
- ITX - OS for NCR I-9300, 9300IP, 9500 and I-10000;
- VRX - OS for NCR 84XX and up;
- VRX/E - OS for NCR C-9800 Fault Tolerant Systems;
- ITX - OS for NCR I-9300, 9300IP, 9500 and I-10000;
- VRX - OS for NCR 84XX and up;
- VRX/E - OS for NCR C-9800 Fault Tolerant Systems;
- IDPS OS for NCR 8100, 8130, 8150;
- FOS - OS for INTEL 8080 chip for programming Modular Teller System.
- RECAPS - OS for 8200/9020 to run 7750 document processing machines.
- TMX - OS for the NCR BAS 5000 series online (branch automation) products.


Is this list complete?

P.S.

Remember NCR IMOS III System Commands?

Assign Input or I-O Magnetic Disc File

label: ASSIGN file-id TO physical-file-id/gen(n,DI)[,OWN,SHR],OLD,NOAUTO,READ,BUFFER,UPDATE;com

Assign Output Disc File

label: ASSIGN file-id TO physical-file-id/gen(n,DI)[,OWN,SHR,PRI],NEW,s,AP[,SCRATCH,SPOOL],NOAUTO,BUFFER,UPDATE;com

...


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: JimT on March 20, 2008, 09:54:12 pm
IRX was also used on the 8400 series.

ITX was first used on the I-9300, and then on the 9300IP and 9500.  The I-9300 was the first commercial processing system with a VLSI based 32 bit processor.  Those were followed by the I-10000 series.


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: uglytuna on March 21, 2008, 04:43:18 am
NCR 315 computers that operated with 33x magnetic tape drives used an operating system called STEP.  Systems that had CRAM units I believe ran another operating system.  I think it was called Kernel or something of that nature.  Are there any geezers out there who still remembers their names?

Herb


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: NEXUS on March 21, 2008, 11:21:55 pm
You may add:

VRX/E for the NCR C-9800 Fault Tolerant Systems.

Emmanuel




As far as I know these are main NCR proprietary OS:

- STEP - OS for NCR 315 with 33x magnetic tape drives;
- KERNEL? - OS for NCR 315 using CRAM;
- B1, B2, B3, B4 - OS for NCR Century series computers;
- DNOS - OS for NCR computers;
- IMOS - OS for NCR 8200 series;
- IRX - OS for NCR 8200, 8400 series;
- MOS - Multiprogramming OS for NCR Century 300 - 350 computers;
- TOX - OS for NCR Century 350 computers at Sumitomo bank, Japan;
- ITX - OS for NCR I-9300, 9300IP, 9500 and I-10000;
- VRX - OS for NCR 84XX and up.

Is this list complete?

P.S.

Remember NCR IMOS III System Commands?

Assign Input or I-O Magnetic Disc File

label: ASSIGN file-id TO physical-file-id/gen(n,DI)[,OWN,SHR],OLD,NOAUTO,READ,BUFFER,UPDATE;com

Assign Output Disc File

label: ASSIGN file-id TO physical-file-id/gen(n,DI)[,OWN,SHR,PRI],NEW,s,AP[,SCRATCH,SPOOL],NOAUTO,BUFFER,UPDATE;com

...



Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: n8eyh with OCD-WM42 of Hilse on March 22, 2008, 03:30:52 pm
Hi!

Will you add more two kernel?
1) "S2" resident executive for the C-615-100 online realtime operating system.
    Although I am not sure the correctness of the code 'S2',
    the B2 executive was too large and needed the feature of HASP for the ISR initiation.
    Then the B2 executive was convenient for the C-615-200 and upper grade processor in Century.
    Does anyone remember the correctness whether the code S2 is right for C-615-100?

2) "TOX-B1" dispatching kernel for the B1 under the TOX OS.
    Like some one introduced in this forum, the TOX OS utilized the B4-like operation in parallel
    with the realtime operation of TOX application.
    The outlook of proccessing similar to the one of B4 operations through the console & CRT display.
    However, the original idea between them was quite different each other.
    Because the B4 OS used to increase the overhead by additional controlled procedures,
    on the other hand, the TOX-B1 caused the reduction of overhead by the protocol conversion
    technique on the communication procedure between the B1 and TOX.
    From my experience of customer services for the B4 user site, the B4 used to be unstable under
    the hardware malfunction like the memory error or the illegal S2 status response at the i/o operation.
    At the time, I thought that the reason of the system down on B4 operation itself would be invited by
    the complexed algrism of the B4 software overlays during hardware troubles.
    This was one of tearful stories at the computer room in my long time ago.
    I like the word 'simple is best.'

 Best regards,
Katsuhiko


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: Aleksandrs Guba on April 12, 2008, 11:41:07 am
"Like most computer mainframe makers, NCR used proprietary operating systems through the 50s, 60s and 70s. I don't recall specific names being used for the 315. Although early days, 315s could support telecommunications, background print spooling and standard batch processing. There was also a famous (or infamous) random access peripheral called Card Random Access Memory (CRAM), where a stack of cards with notches cut at the top, was hung on a series of quarter cylinder rods and a selected card could be "dropped" down a chute onto a drum. The cards were mylar with magnetic oxide like tape, and could be read and written while on the drum, then returned to the deck. The drum cylinder was perforated and vacuum cleaner bits kept the card on the drum while in use. I did once hear it described as Chaos Reaches Al-time Magnitude, but it was genuine random access and if the media was monitored carefully, the system worked well. It was like 256 selectable drums!

When the Century series came out c 1967, there were three versions of the operating system described B1, B2, B3. B1 was a standard, single program batch system, and the only one supported on the Century 100. B2 was a timesharing system that provided for a telecommunications program and a batch partition.  B3 was a full multipartitioned control suite that allowed either a B1 or B2 OS in each partition.

There was also a special OS and (I think) some fairly special hardware too, for Sumitomo Bank in Japan. They had previously used the features of the 315 to the full and NCR needed to do quite a bit to the Century and OS to get similar capabilities for them.

They also had a micro-coded minicomputer around 1972 which had been built originally as a programmable disc controller, but was used by the Retail and Financial groups as a terminal controller and remote mutliplexor. It used an executive (known as SIX) and the Retail group built a store level controller with Tape capture (creating standard format magnetic tapes, and the Financial group used the basis of that system to create their Proof Controller that took care of cheque processing machines. There was no real "OS" at that time. However, General Purpose Systems built an OS to support multiple concurrent terminal users running applications written in interpreted (intermediate code) COBOL, which was called IMOS. As the Criterion range took over from the Century, in addition to the B-family OS replacements, an I-family was born with IRX also being offered on the larger machines.

In 1982 NCR launched the Tower (a trademarked name) which was a Motorola 68000 processor running UNIX. They were the first major supplier (one of the BUNCH) to offer a standard OS on their systems. There were a range of Tower systems built, and they were also sold by Sperry (5000 model I think). Unisys continued with sales for a while after the takeover of Sperry. I think Sperry sold more NCR Towers than NCR!

The Tower became the basis of the Retail and Financial controllers, though there was a similar looking, but higher availability version built by retail. NatWest in the UK adopted that controller for their branches in favour of the "official" Tower Financial system.

In 1991 (I think) NCR announced a switch to Intel processors and the System 3000 range of multiprocessor units. NCR stopped making their own processors, and moved completely to standard OS (mainly UNIX)".



The author of this post is Rick Lugg, who kindly give me his permission to publish it here. I hope that he will join the forum quite soon.

Aleksandrs


P.S. As it was mentioned above, there were a range of Tower systems built. Here's a list of the Tower systems I was able to find:

Tower 1632 and Tower XP (Class 3400)
Mini-Tower (Class 3450)
Tower 32/200 (Class 3800)
Tower 32/300 (Class 3476)
Tower 32/400 (Class 3470)
Tower 32/450 (Class 3475)
Tower 32/500 (Class 3466)
Tower 32/600 (Class 3460)
Tower 32/650 (Class 3465)
Tower 32/700 (Class 3466)
Tower 32/750 (Class 3476)
Tower 32/800 (Class 3600)
Tower 32/850 (Class 3605).

--------------------------

.


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: Herman on July 16, 2008, 09:36:49 pm
If I recall correctly:

- the correct name for Kernel was PACE KERNEL / EXTREMITY that also generated the PM #.. (Pace Message)

- PM # 10: cannot read track
- PM # 15: write protect is ON
- PM # 20: wrong card (or error in track label)
- PM # 23: file full, change deck
- PM # SK: skip track written
- WG DK: wrong deck in unit (or card not not initialized properly)
etc


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: uglytuna on August 18, 2008, 12:05:05 am
Extremity was the name given to all I/O sub-routines used to open Open and Close peripheral files.  It also contained the I/O error sub-routines for those peripherals.  Extremity was used on the 315 by both the Kernal (CRAM) and STEP (mag tape) operating systems.  It was brought forward to the the 615 (Century) B1 and B2 operating systems.

Extremeity was almost completly contained as Software Overlays on the 615.  The overlays were actually an extension of the operating system and were read into from one to four 512 byte areas at the end of memory by the B1 and B2 executives as required.  An extended Disc Directory print would list the overlays on a primary or alternate systems disc.


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: FdeLeon on January 29, 2009, 02:14:39 am
We have to add:
 IDPS for series 8100 - 8130 8150 
Best regards. Fernando


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: Aleksandrs Guba on January 29, 2009, 10:13:46 pm
Thank you, Fernando, but we are speaking here about NCR Proprietary Operating Systems for computers of 20th Century.

Best regards,
Aleksandrs


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: FdeLeon on January 31, 2009, 02:30:06 am
Aleksandrs:
I stay in NCR Corp. Spain for 20 years, and the 8100 series was release in 1980 aprox. I preserve almost all my pocket references of many machines, OS, and lenguages. In a normal e-mail to the master I attach both an urgent scan of the pocket reference of the I-8100 series and Pocket reference of IDPS Operating System. I program many of those machines, with the same COBOL of IMOS III.  For more informatión contact me.
Regards. Fernando.


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: Aleksandrs Guba on January 31, 2009, 05:07:01 pm
Sorry for misunderstanding, Fernando. That was because I decided you meant modern NCR equipment, which I'm not familiar with, as some of it wear analogic identification, for example NCR 8100/8200. IDPS is now added to the OS list.

Thank you for clarifying and scans sent.

Aleksandrs


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: FdeLeon on February 01, 2009, 07:05:50 pm
Don't worry Alexsandrs.
It is normal, we are speaking about things arround 30 years old. Even my English is not so good as before.
Thank you for your job, creating and supporting this wonderful web page.
Best wishes.
Fernando.


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: Systemind on May 25, 2009, 10:55:04 am
Hi,

I will like to add in one OS I used working in 1979 called FOS. It stands for Financial Operating System. The OS was using INTEL 8080 chip for programming for MTS (Modular Teller System) solution.


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: Systemind on May 25, 2009, 11:02:59 am
The FOS also supports 1st version of NCR ATM called NCR 1770 (Lobby) and NCR 1780 (Thru the wall module). The hardware was produced in Dundee and software solution in Dayton.


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: Zedy on October 15, 2009, 04:10:51 pm
RECAPS
Operating system developed in Canada(?) for 8200/9020 to run 7750 document processing machines.

I remember well working back late one night in the Adelaide (South Australia) office assisting one of our programming staff installings RECAPS 4.1 on a 9020 computer.

It just wouldn't install, kept coming back with an error, once decoded, pointed to the disk controller.

The Technical Manager was there too and rang Canada for assistance.

Canada had themselves not yet installed RECAPS 4.1 on a 9020 and informed him they would look into it immediately.

Several hours later they rang back and informed us we needed RECAPS 4.2 for a 9020 because of the different disk controller used in it.

They told us it would be about two days before they could supply 4.2 as they were busy writing it because of our phone call. LOL.

Amazingly once we received the updated version 4.2 everything worked smoothly.

Later 7750 controlling software came from Switzerland but I cannot recall what that was called.


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: RogerHallett on January 13, 2012, 10:30:34 pm
TMX (Transaction Management Executive) was used in Financial Banking Systems as the OS for the NCR BAS 5000 series online (branch automation) products. TMX allowed programs to be written in 'C' with calls to Fortran (and maybe other languages - not sure) if required, then all compiled into run-time. TMX was mutli-tasking, multi-thread if I recall correctly (some help please) and ran on the Motorolla platform in either the Tower box or a smaller custom built box. These controllers had a variety of propriety LAN comms protocols to connect the various banking peripherals (special keyboards, screens, swipe-card readers, passbook printers, back-office printers), and either IBM 3270 or SNA for Wide Area connection to the host. I am sure anyone from E&M Dayton would be able to add value to this post.

Prior to the BAS 5000, the MTS system had its own OS running on the Intel chip. Australia had some of the world's largest MTS and BAS networks.


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: n8eyh with OCD-WM42 of Hilse on January 15, 2012, 04:45:36 pm
Hi! RogerHallett,

Yes, exactly, the TMX is named by the BAS project team of Mr. David Nanda in E&M Dayton. Originally, the project team of Mr. Jerry Butler in E&M Columbia had modified the VERSADOS realtime OS, which is provided by Motorola,  with attaching several functions for the small controller based on MC68010 MPU which was different from the tower 1632 office systems. The BAS project manager tried to evaluate the availability of the Xenix that Mr. Bill Gates renamed the UNIX. However, E&M Dayton imported the OS architecture of VERSADOS from E&M Columbia into the BAS 5000 system, in order to install this modified VERSADOS through attaching several midleware functions for supporting the application friendliness to assist the transaction processing on the Branch Automation Systems. They called this application friendliness as the TMX (Transaction Management Executive). Originally the VERSADOS had been developed by the Motorola. When I attended the VERSADOS lecture room during a week by the Motorola instructor in the NCR Dayton Sugar camp in April, 1981. I was very surprised by the weight functionality of the VERSADOS comparing with the MTS 8 bits Intel MPU. I suspect that the Motorola strategy would be based on the simple procedure program like the 68xx MPU based application under the multi-tasking MC68010 MPU systems. However, on the other hand, the NCR system engineers might looked at this flexible OS like the versatile B4 executive on the powerful Century 300 processor, without detailed simulation of the performance of the TMX based MC68010 processing.
Although I am not sure the availability of LAN (might be OMNI-Net of NCR, 2Mbps transfer rate during the time), the BAS controller supported the IHDLC high speed communication and also the analog type communication for NCR C-270 and ATM etc.
I suspect that this IHDLC high speed lines would make high rate interruption for MC68010 MPU.
I experienced to discuss much time to make sure the performance of total volume processing for the banking transaction in the Japanese financial market. The product management had been very significant in the BAS development, I studied.
Best regards,
Katsuhiko


Title: Re: NCR Proprietary Operating Systems
Post by: msjohnso on March 25, 2012, 02:56:19 pm
"Back in the day" I worked on the Software QA team in Wichita, Kansas for the IMOS, IMOS III, and IMOS V operating systems. All of them ran on the 82xx/9020 minicomputers. For retail systems, the same hardware also supported the TCOS OS, core of the STORES retail system, which had a "full-featured" back-end operating system.

As if that weren't enough, there was also the ICS retail-store scanning system, which was highly optimized to serve bar-code scanning retail terminals. ICS was capable of handling 15 scanners that scanned an aggregate of over 50,000 items per hour.