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Author Topic: NCR 315  (Read 96942 times)
NEXUS
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Posts: 19


« Reply #45 on: January 16, 2010, 11:00:22 pm »

The picture is "history",  and in good condition.
I see the CRAM unit, and I can still sense the field engineer's stress of those days!
Congratulations for being active in programming after all these years.
Regards.



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nlcatter
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Posts: 1


« Reply #46 on: February 09, 2010, 06:30:52 am »

I still  had some CRAM cards until about 7 years ago.

wrote diagnostics on 315 emulator

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terrymoz
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Posts: 17


« Reply #47 on: February 16, 2010, 02:29:43 pm »

My name is Terry Mozley, I was a 315 Instructor at the NCR Training School located at
Borehamwood England. I went to Dayton in 1964 for an upgrade course on the 315-100 and
visited the manufacturing plant on El Segundo Boulavard Hawthorne Ca, On my return to the UK
to teach the 315-100 the school had moved to the North circular Road at Brent. I continued
teaching the 315-100 and in 1968 went to Hawthorne Ca to learn the Century 100 from the
design engineers, I self taught myself the short rod memory for the century system (615) and
taught the other international engineers who were also in Hawthorne at that time. I returned to
England after nine months in Ca to teach the Century 100 system at the training school at
Brent. In 1971 it was decided to relocate the training school from Brent to Dundee in Scotland
and I became Manager of the Dundee school. Unfortunately the move did not work out too well
for me on a personal basis and I reluctantly left NCR in 1972. My career then took me to Control Data
where I managed the London Computer Technology dept of Control Data Institute in London for four years
and then into the IBM plug compatible market with Memorex. I finished my career with Memorex
in 1992 after spending the last five years in Milpitas Ca working as a financial analyst.
I am now fully retired and enjoying life living in Berkhamsted England but still have fond memories
of my time with NCR







     
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JimT
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Posts: 36


« Reply #48 on: February 20, 2010, 01:03:28 am »

Hi Terry.  I worked at El Segundo from 1964 through 1970, when I transferred with the company to Rancho Bernardo.  I started on the 353-2 CRAM and then went to the 615-100 development in 1965.  I remember the classes you spoke of, and I taught at least part of the 615-100 class.  I was the UM on that product until I moved to the 615-101/151 in about 1970 or 1971.
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terrymoz
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Posts: 17


« Reply #49 on: February 20, 2010, 11:33:12 am »

Hi Jim  Good to hear from you, we must have met during that very first training session on
the 615-100 in 1968. As I said in my previous post I in fact taught the 16K memory module
on that course after self learning it from documentation and talking to the engineers.
I very much enjoyed my 9 month  stay in the factory at El Segundo, the enthusism
that prevailed amongst the people working on the 615 was infectious and they were good
times, Other names I remember among the international staff at the time who were also in
El segundo are Gunter Seitz, Hubert Wudke and Tom Stafford, all of which I have sadly lost
touch with. Are you still working Jim, or are you retired like me and reminiscing about the good
times in the past with NCR?
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terrymoz
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Posts: 17


« Reply #50 on: February 20, 2010, 01:29:23 pm »

Hi Jim Reminiscing about the first 615 course at El Segundo has set me thinking.
I cannot recall why I taught the Core memory module on that course. Was I asked
or did I volunteer and why did not the engineers want to teach it. Perhaps as UM
you know more about that time than I. I cant remember the names of the engineers
to whom I spoke at that time but your name Jim Taylor is very familiar. If my memory
serves me correctly I believe the other parts of the course were taught by engineers
who were part of your team?
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JimT
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Posts: 36


« Reply #51 on: February 20, 2010, 07:55:26 pm »

I remember Hubert Wudke and Tom Stafford, but I haven't heard about them in a long time.  I worked with Hubert for awhile.  I retired from NCR in 1998 when they sold their manufacturing operations to Solectron.  However, I stayed at the RB plant and worked with the same people until January 2009 when I retired for real.  You probably remember K.R. (Bob) Crawford.  He managed the field support organization at Hawthorne and RB.  I still see him periodically.  As to the class - there were several different Engineering organizations.  For processors there was the project group and the product group.  I was in the product group, but my management came from the project group.  I reported to Norm Gerstner, who technically reported to Gil Robert.  Then I transferred to  George Foster, who reported to Tom Tang, and Tom reported to Bill Campillo.  One of the reasons that I taught the processor class is that I changed the detailed implementation of the design done by the project group.  I did not change the design itself, but I went through a laborious process to minimize the logic to get it to fit into the backpanel space that we had.  When I got done the project engineers didn't recognize it anymore.  I'm guessing that Doug Starich did the I/O portion.  As for the rod memory, I think there were two issues.  I don't think they had a working level person that would have been suited to teaching the class.  Herb Lee could have done it, but I also think they were still working on improving the design.  We didn't get the rod memory working well until the night before the press release, so there continued to be a lot of design improvement activity in the group for several years.

I can't remember for sure when they officially made me the UM of the 615-100, but I believe it was after the world wide announcement on March 5, 1968.  You probably recognize my name as I signed off on every drawing and DR for the 615-100 processor.  Being the UM did not include managing all of the development, but it did include all of the ongoing engineering and support activities.  Over the years I went back and forth between Continuation Engineering (product support) and Development Engineering.
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terrymoz
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Posts: 17


« Reply #52 on: February 21, 2010, 04:08:46 am »

I do remember Bob Crawford and I also have not seen or heard from Hubert Wudke or Tom Stafford
for some time. I also remember when the first customer 615s were shipped to the UK, at that time
due to my involvement with the short rod memory module in El Segundo I was often called upon
to support the systems and recall spending many a long hour putting current probes on the horizontal
drive wires and changing the transistors if the wave was not square, Quite often the memory ran OK on memory test but dropped a bit when running the  compiler. If my memory is correct the memory was a two wire system the horizontal wire was pulsed and the vertical wire was pulsed in the plateau of the
horizontal pulse, If the rod flipped (stored a 1) a pulse was induced on the plateau of the horizontal
pulse. Without doubt  leading edge technology at that time. Later in my career I became involved
with IBM computer hardware technologies of the 370 series and 303X series all with solid state memories, more reliable perhaps but not as challenging as the 615 rod memory.     
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sameasitev
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Posts: 2


« Reply #53 on: February 21, 2010, 11:33:38 pm »

The first computer I worked on was an NCR 315 back in the mid sixties.  It was at the Moscow Narodny Bank in London.  Being the type of guy who hangs on to odd relics I thought you may get a kick out of my CRAM card.
This was used to help when cutting notches for replacement cards after a head crash.  This is the front (business end) and back (instructions).
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donowens
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Posts: 2


« Reply #54 on: November 26, 2015, 05:35:09 pm »

I started working on the 315 as an apprentice in Indianapolis. In January, I was sent to service the 315 at the Indiana National Bank, reporting to Frank Murphy. He had me working on the CRAM units from day one, but I also assisted with service on the rest of the system before long. In addition to the Indiana National, we also had Merchants National Bank. Between the two site, there were seven Cram units, all my responsibility to service.

In September, I was sent to Dayton for training on the 315, finishing in May 1964. During this time, I received a transfer offer as a Technical Writer for the 353 family and was sent to Hawthorne. It was there I met Jim Taylor, better known to this forum as JimT. I wrote the service and parts manuals for the 353-2 unit. I also wrote manuals for the 420-2.

A side note about the 315 photos in the Gallery - the fourth picture from the end is not related to the 315, it is a 308 (if my memory is right), which NCR oem'ed from either 3M or CDC. It was an octal base machine rather than hexadecimal, and only had paper tape, at least the one I worked on. For some reason, I remember I received a routine to be used for debug and had to key the whole thing in as octal characters - big pain.
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donowens
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Posts: 2


« Reply #55 on: November 26, 2015, 08:08:40 pm »

My memory indeed failed me again! The 308 I mentioned before is actually a 310!
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