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Author Topic: Neat/3  (Read 72008 times)
zster
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Posts: 2


« on: September 16, 2006, 10:11:55 am »

Share some thoughts on Neat/3.   
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Flightplannerjim
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Posts: 6


« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2006, 10:29:04 pm »

Zster:
Wish I could give you some thoughts but when I worked for NCR, I wanted to move from 390 programmer to 315 programmer.
At the time I was responsible for about 7-8 390 installations and the NCR manager finally allowed me to go to an in-house 315 programming class.
After the 2nd or 3rd day of class, the manager decided they needed me back in the field on the 390s and that was the end of my advancement there.
Needless to say, that started my move to "greener pastures".
Worked out greatly.

However, from what I remember Neat and Neat3 were very similar to IBMs Assembler in that they used base and displacement registers for addressing.

Where were you working on the 315s?

Jim
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Worked for NCR as a 390 programmer in 1963-1966 in Philadelphia, PA.
rayden61
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I.T. Professional with over 20 yrs experience.


« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2006, 05:28:52 pm »

Don't know if it was Neat/3 but we referred to it as NEATVS when I worked on the NCR V-8500 and the V-8900. Worked extensively in computer operations and did loads of application programming. Can still see those JCL lines of codes and the piles of job details we had to go through...

Those were the days...lol

Martin
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NEXUS
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Posts: 19


« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2006, 06:18:15 pm »

Don't know if it was Neat/3 but we referred to it as NEATVS when I worked on the NCR V-8500 and the V-8900. Worked extensively in computer operations and did loads of application programming. Can still see those JCL lines of codes and the piles of job details we had to go through...

Those were the days...lol

Martin


NEAT/3 was an Assembly language used in NCR-315 systems.
NEATVS  came later with the Criterion Series (NCR-8500) in 1970s.

Regards.

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rayden61
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I.T. Professional with over 20 yrs experience.


« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2006, 08:45:52 pm »

Don't know if it was Neat/3 but we referred to it as NEATVS when I worked on the NCR V-8500 and the V-8900. Worked extensively in computer operations and did loads of application programming. Can still see those JCL lines of codes and the piles of job details we had to go through...

Those were the days...lol

Martin


NEAT/3 was an Assembly language used in NCR-315 systems.
NEATVS  came later with the Criterion Series (NCR-8500) in 1970s.

Regards.




Hey Nexus, thanks for the correction. I worked as a computer operator on the NCR V-8500 and 8900 series. Worked all the way up to application programmer/analyst before they shut the datacenter down to move to windows based systems and networks.

Martin
« Last Edit: October 04, 2006, 08:47:42 pm by rayden61 » Logged
n8eyh with OCD-WM42 of Hilse
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Posts: 60


WWW
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2006, 03:53:50 pm »

Hi, All!
I'm now logging on this thread 'NEAT/3', from Yokohama, Japan.
I appreciate dear zster's initiation.
Because I could notice the original idea of the term 'NEAT/3'.
N  : NCR's
E  : Electronic
A  : Autocoding
T  : Technique
/3 : the third generation for Century computer.

Incidentally, the first generation of NEAT is for NCR304.
The second generation is for NCR315.

Well, we have NEAT/14 in Japan.
We were the fresh 14 persons and children as the Century NEAT/3 programmer
of NCR Japan Tokyo head office in 1969.
We were like sponge of the computer knowledge and
we do not know the limitation of our knowledge.
It's so soon for us to become wel-trained person to manipulate our lovely computer.
Tomorrow, we are going to meet together at the old cottage ever owned by NCR Japan,
even though these children are the retired uncles all now.
I would like to confirm that we got so valuable thought and mind through our job in NCR.

I will report our performance of meeting soon.

Best regards,
Katsuhiko
« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 12:18:01 am by n8eyh » Logged

Katsuhiko Hirai
Fan of the Century architecture under 63 index registers.
Flightplannerjim
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Posts: 6


« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2006, 06:10:59 pm »

Maybe I'm way off on this, but I seem to remember NEAT3 being developed and used initially for the 315, 100 Series, which was the economy model of the 315.

Kind of like the IBM Series 50, which was the IBM accounting machine that ran at 1/2 speed of it's predecessor, for 1/2 the cost. All because of the size of the pulleys used in it. When the customers learned this, they replaced the pulleys on their own and had a full speed machine at 1/2 the cost.

In the Philadelphia NCR office, we refered to it as the "Thrifty Fifty".
« Last Edit: November 02, 2006, 09:24:42 pm by Flightplannerjim » Logged

Worked for NCR as a 390 programmer in 1963-1966 in Philadelphia, PA.
n8eyh with OCD-WM42 of Hilse
Jr. Member
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Posts: 60


WWW
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2006, 01:36:09 pm »

Related to NEAT/14 member's meeting in the cottage, hot-spring and viewing Mt. Fuji:

The second meeting of NEAT/14 old boys was held at the cottage in Izu-Hakone near the Oiso factory of NCR Japan at Nov. 2-3.
We could confirm our faces one another at the Odawara railway station,
and we did thank god for our good health in this decade since last dinner party of 1996.
Our first stage approach was to study the Odawara castle and the history of Samurai era lifes, costumes and swords.
We found the mini-sized calculator 'Soro-ban' of five-unit bead built-in small box with a brush to write numbers, looked like a palm-top PC.
The second stage was to take bath-time in hot-spring of the cottage with good effects to old boys 'ever-programmer'.
The third stage was to celebrate the attendance of NEAT/14 old boys at the dinner party
with Hawaiian electric guitar sound by old boy player who manipulated iron wires and foot pedals.
We introduced a personal short history of NCR days, recent business experience and voluntary activity.
WE could understand our challenge in a life.

We enjoyed the event completely and made sure a plan of next event of Kyushu in November, 2011.
We are appreciated of NCR's bands.

Best regards,
Katsuhiko
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Katsuhiko Hirai
Fan of the Century architecture under 63 index registers.
JUICE
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Posts: 1


« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2007, 11:06:55 pm »

HI. my first programming job was with ncr neat/3 and cobol in 78 in ct. i forget the ncr model but i think it only had 5 partitions. we had neat/3 level 1 and 2 and something called translated neat/3 which i believe was code created by a neat to neat/3 translator. i couldnt follow the translated stuff if my life depended on it.  anybody remember olpd?
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n8eyh with OCD-WM42 of Hilse
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Posts: 60


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« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2007, 04:09:48 am »

Hi! JUICE,
Good morning from Japan.
I was a programmer of the NCR Century computer that  was a former generation of the Criterion computer series.
I have an old sales manual of the OLPD methodology on the VRX operating system for the Criterion computer.
The maqnual introduces the capability of 8 user entries with CRT, printer and tty-teletype.
The OLPD for programmer had provided ten commands for the system controls and six commands for the file controls.
The system commands were confiured by ON, UNITS, SPACE, TIME, VIEW, MAKE, ACCOUNT, PASSWORD, OPERATOR and FINISH.
The file commands were CREATE, EDIT, LIST, DELETE, RECOVER and EXECUTE.

Unfortunately, I have no experience to try it, because I left NCR before coming the VRX generation.
What is your feeling from the OLPD?

Best regards,
Katsuhiko
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Katsuhiko Hirai
Fan of the Century architecture under 63 index registers.
n8eyh with OCD-WM42 of Hilse
Jr. Member
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Posts: 60


WWW
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2007, 01:48:24 pm »

Hi! all,
I just came back here.
Today in the micro-processor based software, I found the technology of passive multi-tasking.
If my understanding is correct, the original idea had been born and implemented successfully, in 1975, by Mr. Hiromichi Ishikawa who was one of leader in the NCR real-time kernel development for the Sumitomo Bank. And secondly Dr. Paul Hilfinger, UC Berkeley, introduced the passive tasking on the ADA technique for the multi-tasking in 1982.
These idea had come from the propose to eliminate the low-productivity in the task-dispatching in order to provide the computing power for the application processing.
Nowadays the more hard real-time processing would be must in the embedded software computing like the safety controlling of the car driving.
However my concern is that the core technology of the computer hardware and software is originated even now to the idea of several decade ago.
We have to kick the ball to make new ideas as soon as possible and play the game to produce the friendly computing for this globe.

Best regards,
Katsuhiko
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Katsuhiko Hirai
Fan of the Century architecture under 63 index registers.
dlreedy
Newbie
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Posts: 4


« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2007, 04:24:31 pm »

Hello All,
I joined NCR in 1970 and used NEAT/3 levels 1 and 2 to develop banking software for the Century 200, 300 and later Criterion systems.  It was very much like the IBM Assembler and therefore easy to learn, having used the IBM Assembler previously in the US Air Force.  I continued programming in this versatile language until 1996 when the bank for which I am now working converted from the NCR CLASS and CIF financial systems running on the V-8500 Series to an IBM AS/400.  I value my years working for NCR and have many fond memories throughout the 1970's.
Dennis Reedy
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Dennis Reedy
Former NCR Dayton Employee
GaryG
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Posts: 1


« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2007, 07:56:17 pm »

This message board brings back lots of happy memories for me.

I began writing in NEAT/3 & NEAT VS back in the early 1980's - on I think an 8565. I stayed with NCR mainframes up till  '93 (I think) - by then I had progressed onto a 9800 (wow).

By todays standards anyone who used NEAT would be classed as a computer 'geek' - able to apply manual patches to code at run time, and if required, recode DURING execution......... Ah happy days   Smiley 

The saddest day, was when I was required to initialize the disc array, as we migrated onto an IBM.

Gary
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Dellji
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Posts: 2


« Reply #13 on: April 25, 2007, 03:39:22 am »

I started writing in NEAT/3 in 1970.  NEAT/3 is the 3rd generation of NEAT and was for the Century, NEAT was for the 315.  I was the USDPG Product Manager for 10 years from 1980-1990 and many of you may have seen me at NUCON each year.

Jim Dell
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RetrospectUK
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Posts: 14


WWW
« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2007, 01:02:35 pm »

Hi everyone.

I have the programming manual for NEAT on the NCR ELLIOTT 4100 dating from 1966 and the NEAT3 books; 'NCR Century Handbook for Systems Analysts' (1975), 'NCR Century Operators Handbook' (1973) and 'NCR Century Operating Handbook' (1975). They are large publications to scan in and put on the web but if anyone requires any specific information about NEAT commands let me know and I will be happy to copy and pass on any relevent sections.

Ian (UK)
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